Lenovo X1 Carbon (7th Gen) Review

Lenovo X1 Carbon (7th Gen) Review

As a writer, blogger, and all-around everyday computer user, I cannot begin to explain the significance of a laptop that works efficiently and effectively at all times. I was in need of a new laptop a few weeks ago and decided to branch out from my typical update to my MacBook as the prices have skyrocketed for their products over the last few years. This leads me to what I will be discussing throughout week 28’s review, the Lenovo X1 Carbon.

General Lenovo Laptop Info

Lenovo is extremely well known as one of the best laptop companies for powerful, business computers. They have a ton of different series of workbooks as well, ranging from the X-series (the “Ultraportable Productive” series that I went with) to their P-series (their most powerful mobile workstation). At first glance, their laptops are more expensive than many other competing brands, yet Lenovo almost always has some sort of mega-deal going on. They also proudly tout five different types of laptops that one can buy: Traditional, 2-in-1, Thin and Light, Complete Mobile Workstation, and Chromebook. Because of the largely varying types, sizes, and specs you can also find very reasonable prices on many models even before the sales price kicks in.

Comparison to Mac

As I mentioned above, I ended up going with the X-series laptop because it had the exact mix of power and performance that I wanted. I currently am only using my laptop for writing, researching, and day-to-day activities, but I wanted something that could withstand massive business excel spreadsheets for when I transition to a remote role over the next year or so. So I ended up buying the following

ThinkPad X1 Carbon (Gen7)

  • 10th Gen Intel® Core™ i7 Processor with 1.1 to 4.7GHz
  • 6 Cores with 12 MB of Cache
  • 14″ Anti-glare touchscreen with a 720p HD front-facing camera
  • 16 GB of Memory with a 512 GB SSD Hard Drive
  • Integrated Intel® UHD Graphics

Now, this specific model was a little over $3,000, but after the “sale price” is applied the total ends up just over $1,500. Let’s compare the specs of the closest MacBooks…

MacBook Pro (13″ Base Model) – $1,299

  • 13.3″ Retina Display
  • Quad‑core Intel Core i5, 1.4 to 3.9GHz, with 128MB of eDRAM
  • 128GB SSD with 8GB of 2133MHz LPDDR3 onboard memory
  • Intel Iris Plus Graphics 645
  • 720p FaceTime HD camera

MacBook Pro (16″ Base Model) – $2,399

  • 16″ Retina Display
  • 2.6GHz 6‑core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 4.5GHz, with 12MB shared L3 cache
  • 512GB SSD with 16GB of 2666MHz DDR4 onboard memory
  • AMD Radeon Pro 5300M with 4GB of GDDR6 memory and automatic graphics switching
  • 720p FaceTime HD camera

So as you can see, my laptop more closely resembles the 16″ base model for Apple’s laptops. Even though the MacBook has a larger screen, it is not touch screen compatible. Almost everything else matches up, yet the base price is roughly $700 more than my laptop. Also, I continue saying “sale price” for the Lenovo laptop, but these sales run year-round. If you’re paying full price for one of their products you’re doing something wrong!

The 13″ MacBook model barely even compares when it’s fully maxed out, and that will run you a hefty $1,999. I did, of course, lose the general easiness that comes with setting up a Mac and its supporting products, but all in all I haven’t struggled too much with this completely new system. I am more than happy with my decision and would highly recommend making the switch if you’re in need of a powerful alternative to the ever-increasing prices that come with Apple and its products.


Thanks for reading my Weekly Review on my new Lenovo Laptop! If anyone else has recently made the move away from Apple I’d love to hear why and how it’s going in the comment section below. As always, be sure to head on over to the DustyPosts blog after and give the rest of my content a read!

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